A brilliant female architect whose designs were initially described as ‘unbuildable’ went on to become recognised as one of the leading architects of the world.

That was the story of Iraqi born Zaha Hadid presented by lecturer Professor Colin Davies at Monday’s Narrabri ADFAS lecture.

Prof Davies was a contemporary of Zaha Hadid – both attended the world leading London Architectural Association School of Architecture as students.

Colin Davies is an architect, a former editor of The Architects’ Journal and a regular contributor to architectural magazines world-wide.

He was until recently Professor of Architectural Theory at London Metropolitan University.

He has made numerous TV and radio appearances.

His books include ‘A New History of Modern Architecture’, ‘Thinking about Architecture’.’

His entertaining talk gave a great insight into the life of Zaha Hadid who was a groundbreaker in design creativity.

“Modern architecture is always controversial” Mr Davies told the audience.”

People tended to favour traditional forms.

“But Zaha Hadid was an avant- garde designer who took architecture into new territory.”

The evidence of her creativity is now found in major buildings around the world. However, after moving from Iraq to London and beginning her career, Zaha Hadid had no commissions and no paying jobs.

“She was able to survive and employ a small team because she came from a wealthy family” Mr Davies said.

In the early stages of her career Zaha Hadid was better known as an accomplished artist.

That creative talent was ultimately given more physical form in architecture and Zaha Hadid produced cutting edge building designs with the catalyst for commercial success coming from a partnership with fellow architect Patrick Schumacher.

Some were considered too avant-Gard and not built by her clients.

Zaha Hadid hated many of the traditional forms – she never used something as prosaic as a 90 degree angle. Her designs were free flowing and entirely original.

The ADFAS audience was taken through Zaha Hadid’s career by Mr Davies, with many illustrations of her striking architectural designs and ADFAS members later joined the lecturer for a glass of wine and a chat.